You are here: Home » What Mountain Bike » Blog » Eight steps to re-rimming a wheel

Eight steps to re-rimming a wheel

| Blog, Knowledge, What Mountain Bike | 21/09/2011 10:55am

Justin Loretz walks you through the simple steps to re-rimming your wheels

Right rim
Make sure you have the correct replacement rim. Rims vary in their cross-sectional dimensions and a different model replacement can cause your original spokes to be the wrong size. Also check it’s got the correct number of spoke holes.


Loosen spokes
Having removed the tube and rim tape, start at the valve hole and loosen the spokes. Work around the wheel, reducing tension gradually (about half a turn at a time). This avoids placing undue stress on any one spoke. Don’t fully undo them.


Join the rims
Line up the rims so that the stickers on each rim face the same direction then align the valve holes so they’re directly adjacent to each other. Tape the rims tightly together with some electrical tape.


Transfer spokes
Begin at the valve hole and start to unwind spokes from the original rim. Swap them directly sideways so they fit into matching holes on the new rim. By going one by one you don’t need to understand lacing or drive spoke direction.


Starting tension
When you’ve transferred the spokes to the new rim, begin the tensioning process with an even tension on each spoke. Work methodically around the rim, tightening the spokes a turn at a time until the nipple just covers all the spoke threads.


Add tension
Now you can add further tension to the spokes, again using half turns. Starting at the valve for reference, continue until you’re at about half the total tension required. Use your other wheel(s) as a rough guide as to what full tension feels like.


Check dishing
Check the centralisation of the rim in the frame with a ruler or tape. Add tension of one eighth of a turn to the spokes (on a complete side) to pull the rim over to make up for any discrepancies.


Final tension
With the rim evenly positioned in the frame you can add final tension (half a turn at a time). When you reach the correct tension (using your other wheels as a guide), you can fine-tune the trueness of the wheel.

Share

This entry was posted on Wednesday, September 21st, 2011 at 10:55 am and is filed under Blog, Knowledge, What Mountain Bike. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Tags: , , , ,

Comments are closed.

Popular Tags